Funny and creative privacy notices

Funny and Creative Privacy Notices

Carmen E.

GDPR Driven Privacy Notices

 

We hope that by now you have finished reading over the flood of privacy notice updates you’ve received and – ehm – you haven’t just been clicking delete each time you see one pop up in your email. Yes, you should be reading each privacy notice update you receive. Ever since the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) has come into place companies are now required to describe in an explicit manner how they handle your data, what your rights are regarding your data, and how to opt out from some of the company’s uses of your data in their privacy policies. This provides you, the user, much more control of what happens to your data. It’s great stuff, if you read it!

Without a doubt, some companies have gone above and beyond with their privacy policy rewrites, sprinkling it with spice, humor, and well…honesty. One company that really takes you for a ride with their privacy policy is Writers’ HQ. Writers’ HQ privacy policy starts with the following:

“The best bit about the GDPR is that all this has to be “concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible” so hold on to your hats, motherf**kers, this is going to be the shortest, clearest and best freakin’ privacy policy you ever did see.

So. Here we go…”

” Without a doubt, some companies have gone above and beyond with their privacy policy rewrites, sprinkling it with spice, humor, and well…honesty..”

You are sure to get a laugh so go ahead and read it. Other companies that used their creativity when rewriting their privacy policy are Tumblr.

“Tumblr may determine your location by using drone technology and live video feeds. Ha ha, no, we just check out your IP address or any location data you attach to a post. Normal stuff.”

And, of course, not to be outdone, Web Comic XKCD has a great, albeit not real, privacy notice.

Not necessarily funny, but definitely on the creative and informative sited, the UK’s ICO has a video you can watch that informs you what information their privacy notice contains and your rights.

If you have a funny, creative or other interesting privacy notice we should highlight, contact us.

And, of course, if you don’t have time to make a privacy notice like these, you can always use our award-winning privacy notice generator at simpleprivacynotice.com!

P.S. You can get started for free!

Finally, EASILY Create Privacy Notices That Meet the Requirements of the European Union GDPR

Differences in a Privacy Notice vs. Privacy Policy

Differences in a Privacy Notice vs. Privacy Policy

Carmen E.

Privacy policy, privacy notice = po”tay”to, po”tah”to, right? Wrong, my friend! It is not a case of po”tay”to, po”tah”to . A privacy policy and a privacy notice, though they both begin with the word privacy are two different concepts.

A Privacy Notice, which is what most of the public is familiar with, refers to an external statement to consumers letting them know how a business is using their data. A privacy notice typically tells the individual what information is collected, how it’s protected, the legal base for processing the data, categories of personal data, how the information is shared (or not shared), retention periods, data subject’s rights, contact information of the responsible party, etc.

Privacy notices exist solely to let the consumer know what, why, and how their personal data is being used. Most times people don’t even read the privacy notices websites provide due to how long and how full of technical/ legal jargon they are. That makes understanding to what you are agreeing to a tricky proposition. That is where the GDPR comes to the rescue, to help consumers with the comprehensibility of privacy notices. One of GDPR’s requirements is to have privacy notices that are in a concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language, in particular for any information addressed specifically to a child. (Article 12)

” Most times people don’t even read the privacy notices websites provide due to how long and how full of technical/ legal jargon they are..”

Websites often refer to their privacy notice as a privacy policy, but that’s not technically accurate. A privacy policy is an internal statement used by companies to define guidelines on the handling of the personal data. A privacy policy contains more detail as to how employees should process personal data, restrictions, how personal data is classified, who the policy applies (any third party), protection standards, roles, and responsibilities, etc. In other words, a privacy policy directs employees how to handle data.

Repeat after me a Privacy Notice is an external statement that lets the consumer know what is being done with their data while a Privacy Policy is an internal statement designed to guide employees in the handling of personal data. Good job kiddos you just learned something important.

Now that we have that settled, want some help creating a simple, GDPR compliant, easy to read privacy notice for your website? Just click here to begin.

Finally, EASILY Create Privacy Notices That Meet the Requirements of the European Union GDPR